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General Information - Pension Schedule (Form 4884)

16 benefits from the deceased spouse. If you are filing your final joint tax return because your spouse died during the tax year, do not complete line 6 or check box 7B.

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Text of General Information - Pension Schedule (Form 4884)

14$40,000 for a married filing jointly return. If you checked either box 23C or 23F your standard deduction is increased by $15,000. If you checked both boxes 23C and 23F your standard deduction is increased by $30,000. The standard deduction is reduced by any amounts reported on line 11 and any military pay included on line most cases, taxpayers who complete line 24 should not complete lines 25 or 26. However, if a taxpayer is the unremarried surviving spouse of a decedent born prior to 1946 who also died after reaching age 65, the taxpayer should check the box below line 26 and may then claim the Michigan standard deduction on line 24 and a deduction for investment income on line 26 (if applicable).Line 25: Qualifying retirement and pension benefits included in your AGI may be subtracted from income. Pension and retirement benefits are taxed differently depending on the age of the recipient. See Which Benefits are Taxable below. You must attach Form 4884. If you were born during the period January 1, 1946 through January 1, 1949, see line 26: Senior citizens born prior to 1946 (or the unremarried surviving spouse of a decedent born prior to 1946 who also died after reaching age 65) may subtract interest, dividends, and capital gains included in AGI. This subtraction is limited to a maximum of $11,104 on a single return or $22,207 on a joint return and is reduced by any deduction for: Military (including Michigan National Guard) retirement benefits from line 11 Railroad retirement benefits from line 11 Public and private pension and retirement benefits from line 25 Amount used for the federal credit for the elderly and totally and permanently disabled from line further assistance, go to Information - Pension Schedule (Form 4884)What are Pension and Retirement BenefitsUnder Michigan law, qualifying pension and retirement benefits include most payments that are reported on a 1099-R for federal tax purposes. This includes defined benefit pensions, IRA distributions, and most payments from defined contribution plans. Payments received before the recipient could retire under the provisions of the plan or benefits from 401(k), 457, or 403(b) plans attributable to employee contributions alone are not pension and retirement benefits under Michigan law, are taxable and are subject to benefits include distributions from the following sources: Pension plans that define eligibility for retirement and set contribution and benefit amounts in advance Qualified retirement plans for the self-employed Retirement distributions from a 401(k) or 403(b) plan attributable to employer contributions or attributable to employee contributions that result in additional employer contributions ( , matching contributions) IRA distributions received after age 59 or described by Section 72(t)(2)(A)(iv) of the IRC (series of equal periodic payments made for life) Benefits from any of the previous plans received due to a disability, or as a surviving spouse if the decedent qualified for the subtraction at the time of death and was born prior to January 1, 1953 Benefits paid to a senior citizen (age 65 or older) from a retirement annuity policy that are paid for life (as opposed to a specified number of years) Foreign pension and retirement benefits that meet Michigan s qualifications may also be public benefits include distributions from the following sources: The State of Michigan Michigan local governmental units ( , Michigan counties, cities, and school districts) Federal civil and pension benefits that are transferred from one plan to another (rolled over) continue to be treated as if they remained in the original public and private pension or retirement benefits, you may not subtract: Amounts received from a deferred compensation plan that lets the employee set the amount to be put aside and does not set retirement age or requirements for years of service. These plans include, but are not limited to, plans under Sections 401(k), 457, and 403(b) of the IRC Amounts received before the recipient could retire under the plan provisions, including amounts paid on separation, withdrawal, or discontinuance of the plan Amounts received as early retirement incentives, unless the incentives were paid from a pension Benefits are TaxablePension and retirement benefits are taxed differently depending on the age of the recipient. Married couples filing a joint return should complete Form 4884 based on the year of birth of the older spouse. Military and Michigan National Guard pensions, railroad retirement benefits and Social Security benefits are exempt from tax and should be reported on the Schedule 1, line 11 or line May Claim a Pension Subtraction Recipients born before 1946 may subtract all qualifying pension and retirement benefits received from public sources, and may subtract qualifying private pension and retirement benefits up to $49,811 if single or married filing separate, or $99,623 if married filing a joint return. If your public retirement benefits are greater than the maximum amount you are not entitled to claim an additional subtraction for private pensions. NOTE: In addition to the public retirement benefits listed above, the private pension limits are also reduced by the following from Schedule 1, line 11:15 Military retirement from the Armed Forces Retirement from the Michigan National Guard Railroad retirement. Recipients born during the period January 1, 1946through January 1, 1949, do not complete Form Schedule 1, line 24. Recipients born after January 1, 1949 throughDecember 31, 1952 will be able to deduct up to $20,000in qualifying pension and retirement benefits if single ormarried filing separate or up to $40,000 if married filing ajoint return. Generally, all pension or retirement benefits(public and private) are treated the same unless therecipient also has significant benefits from service in Armed Forces or Michigan National Guard, orreceives taxable railroad retirement benefits. Recipientswho deduct military retirement benefits due to service inthe Armed Forces or Michigan National Guard, ortaxable railroad retirement benefits on Schedule 1, line 11may have lower deduction limits if these deductions totalmore than $29,811 on a single return or $59,623 on a jointreturn. See the instructions for line 8, 16 or 27 ofForm 4884, whichever applies, for more information. Recipients born on or after January 1, 1953 but beforeJanuary 2, 1954 who have reached age 62 and receiveretirement benefits from employment exempt fromSocial Security may deduct up to $15,000 in qualifyingpension and retirement benefits. If both spouses on a jointreturn receive Social Security exempt retirement benefits,the maximum deduction increases to $30,000. See Form 4884, line 28 instructions for more information. All other recipients born after 1952, all pension andretirement benefits are taxable and you are not entitled toa pension help calculating the pension and retirement subtraction, see Which Section of Form 4884 Should I Complete? on page 16. Retirement Benefits from a Deceased SpouseCalculate the amount of deductible retirement benefits received as a survivor of a deceased spouse based on the birth year of the deceased spouse and the filing status of the surviving spouse. Retirement benefits received as a survivor generally have a distribution code of 4 on the federal Form 1099-R. The 1099-R reports retirement benefits to the Internal Revenue Service and it is sent by the pension administrator paying the 1: A single filer who receives retirement benefits as the surviving spouse of a decedent born in 1952 (Tier 2) would be able to subtract up to $20,000 in qualified retirement benefits received from the deceased spouse. Example 2: A married filer who receives retirement benefits as the surviving spouse of a decedent born in 1942 (Tier 1) would be able to subtract all public retirement benefits received from the deceased spouse and private retirement benefits received up to $99,623, reduced by any public benefits received from the deceased spouse. Generally, any retirement benefits deducted as a survivor reduce the amount of other retirement benefits that may be deducted. Example 3: If the filer in Example 1 was born in 1952 (Tier 2), any retirement benefits received from the deceased spouse that are deductible will reduce the filer s maximum deduction for retirement benefits of $20,000. NOTE: Filers born after 1952 (Tier 3) receiving survivor benefits from a deceased spouse born in Tier 1 complete Section B of Form 4884. Filers born after 1952 (Tier 3) receiving survivor benefits from a deceased spouse born in Tier 2 complete Section C of Form Instructions for Pension Schedule (Form 4884)For help calculating the pension and retirement subtraction, visit . NOTE: For purposes of this form, single limits apply to taxpayers who are married filing not listed are explained on the 1, 2, and 3: Enter your name(s) and Social Security number(s). If you are married filing separate returns, enter both Social Security numbers, but do not enter your spouse s 4 and 5: Enter your year(s) of birth. If you are married and filing separately, do not enter your spouse s year of 6: Enter deceased spouse name, Social Security number and year of birth. If deceased spouse was born after December 31, 1952, STOP; you may not deduct retirement Filing StatusBirth YearRetirement BenefitsTierRetirement Benefits Deduction LimitsSingle/SeparateBefore 1946Tier 1All public plus private benefits up to $49,811 combinedSingle/Separate**1946 through 1952Tier 2 $20,000Single/SeparateAfter 1952Tier 3No deduction*JointBefore 1946Tier 1All public plus private benefits up to $99,623 combined*Joint**1946 through 1952Tier 2$40,000*JointAfter 1952Tier 3No deduction*On a joint return, determine the eligibility for deducting retirement benefits using the age of the older spouse.** Taxpayers born during the period January 1, 1946 through January 1, 1949 should not deduct retirement benefits; you are eligible for the Michigan Standard Deduction. See Schedule 1, line 24 instructions. 16benefits from the deceased spouse. If you are filing your final joint tax return because your spouse died during the tax year, do not complete line 6 or check box : When completing Form 4884, surviving spouse means the deceased spouse died prior to the current tax year ( when filing a 2015 return the spouse died in 2007). Deceased spouse benefits do not include benefits from a spouse who died in 7: If you have more than ten qualifying entries, continue those entries on the 2015 Michigan Pension Continuation Schedule (Form 4973). Only include benefits from taxpayer(s) born after 1952 if you qualify to complete Section D of Form 4884 or if you are filing a joint return when the older spouse was born before 7B: For each qualifying pension and retirement benefit attributable to a deceased spouse put an X in column 7B. See instructions for line 6 for more information on deceased spouse benefits. Line 7C: If an individual has multiple retirement and pension benefits from the same Payer FEIN and distribution code, combine those amounts on the same 7D: List the distribution code from box 7 of the federal Form 7F: Include the taxable amount of retirement or pension reported in federal AGI. If you are a part-year resident only use the portion from the Michigan Schedule NR, line 10 column 8: If you or your spouse reported any retirement and pension benefits from service in the Armed Forces, the Michigan National Guard or any taxable railroad retirement benefits reported on Schedule 1, line 11, these amounts should be subtracted from the allowable private pension deduction limits. For purposes of this line, single limits apply to taxpayers who are married filing separately. Amounts deducted on Schedule 1, line 11, are not deducted again on Form 4884, and are only used to reduce the allowable deduction for private retirement and pension benefits. For example, if a joint filer born in 1945 received $30,000 in retirement benefits from service in the Armed Forces the allowable private deduction limit reported on line 8 would be $99,623 - $30,000 = $69, 12: If you checked either SSA Exempt box 23C or 23F from Schedule 1, your maximum is increased by $15,000. If you checked both boxes 23C and 23F your maximum is increased by $30, 15: Carry this amount to Schedule 1, line 25. Do not complete Section B, Section C or Section 16: If you or your spouse received and reported any retirement and pension benefits from service in the Armed Forces or Michigan National Guard, or any taxable railroad retirement benefits reported on Schedule 1, line 11, these amounts should be subtracted from the allowable private pension deduction limit here. Amounts deducted on Schedule 1, line 11, are not deducted again on Form 4884 and are only used to reduce the allowable deduction for private retirement and pension 22: Do not include benefits received from a deceased spouse (who died prior to 2015).Line 23: If you checked either SSA Exempt box 23C or 23F from Schedule 1, your maximum is increased by $15,000. If you checked both boxes 23C and 23F your maximum is increased by $30, 26: Carry this amount to Schedule 1, line 25. Do not complete Section A, Section C or Section 27: If you checked either SSA Exempt box 23C or 23F from Schedule 1, your maximum is increased by $15,000. If you checked both boxes 23C and 23F your maximum is increased by $30,000. Taxpayers who were born after January 1, 1949, who are receiving benefits from a deceased spouse who was born during the period January 1, 1946 through January 1, 1949 should also use Section C to calculate the deduction for retirement and pension benefits. Benefits received due to individuals born after 1952 are not f Which Section of Form 4884 Should I Complete?Using the information from line 7, complete Section A, Section B, Section C or Section D. To determine which section of the form to complete, answer the following Were pension or retirement benefits received by a filer or spouse (if married filing jointly) born prior to January 1, 1953, or were surviving spouse benefits received for a deceased spouse who was born prior to January 1, 1953 and died prior to Januar y 1, 2015? Yes: Continue to question 2. No: If you or your spouse (if married filing jointly) have reached age 62 and receive Social Security exempt retirement benefits, complete Section D of Form 4884, otherwise you are not eligible for a pension or retirement benefits subtraction. Do not file Form Was the older of filer or spouse (if married filing jointly) born during the period January 1, 1946 through January 1, 1949? Yes: Do not file Form 4884. Use Schedule 1, line 24 (see instructions, page 13). No: Continue to question Was older of filer or spouse (if married filing jointly) born prior to January 1, 1946? Yes: Complete Section A of Form 4884. No: Continue to question Is filer or spouse (if married filing jointly) receiving benefits from a deceased spouse who was born prior to January 1, 1946 and died prior to Januar y 1, 2015? Yes: Complete Section B of Form 4884. No: Complete Section C of Form 2 for Filers with Taxable Railroad Retirement Benefits or Qualifying Pension and Retirement Benefits from Service in the Armed Forces or Michigan National Guard and Completing Section C of Form military retirement benefits due to service in the Armed Forces or Michigan National Guard and taxable railroad retirement benefits reported on Schedule 1, line 11. ......................... public retirement and pension benefits reported on Form 4884, line 7. ............................... lines 1 and 2. ........................................ ........................................ ........................................ .. private retirement and pension benefits reported on Form 4884, line 7. ............................. $49,811 if single or $99,623 if filing jointly. ........................................ ................................... line 3 from line 5. If less than zero, enter $0. ........................................ ......................... the smaller of line 4 or line 6. ........................................ ........................................ ............... line 2 and line 7. ........................................ ........................................ ..................................... $20,000 if single or $40,000 if filing jointly. Higher limits apply if you checked Schedule 1, box 23C or 23F (see line 11 below). ........................................ ........................................ .............. the smaller of line 8 or line 9 here and on Form 4884, line 27. ........................................ .... for filers with benefits from employment exempt from the Social Security $20,000 if single or $40,000 if filing jointly. ........................................ .................................. you checked box 23C or 23F on Schedule 1, enter $15,000 for each box checked. ................. line 11 and line 12. This is your maximum deduction for line 9 of this Worksheet. ............... 4884 Various Scenariosyou deducted military retirement benefits, or taxable railroad retirement benefits on Schedule 1, line 11, your deduction for retirement or pension benefits received from a private source may be reduced. To determine your allowable subtraction, use Worksheet 2 below if you have taxable railroad retirement benefits or qualifying pension and retirement benefits from service in the Armed Forces or Michigan National Guard and you are completing Section C of Form this amount to Schedule 1, line 25. Do not complete Section A, Section B, or Section 28: If you checked box 23C and/or 23F on Schedule 1 and the older of you or your spouse was born on or after January 1, 1953 but before January 2, 1954, enter all qualifying retirement and pension benefits you received, up to $15,000. If both spouses on a joint return have retirement benefits from employment exempt from the Social Security Act, the maximum deduction is $30,000. Recipients who deduct taxable railroad retirement benefits or military retirement benefits due to service in the Armed Forces or Michigan National Guard on Schedule 1, line 11 may have lower deduction limits on this line if the Schedule 1, line 11 totals more than $34,811. For additional information and to determine your allowable subtraction, refer to the Worksheet for Filers with Taxable Railroad Retirement Benefits or Qualifying Pension and Retirement Scenario 1: Single filer born after January 1, 1949 through December 31, 1952 (Tier 2) with retirement/pension is filing as single. He was born in 1950 and is receiving a private pension of $25,000 with a distribution code of 1:After completing lines 1 and 2, Henry enters 1950 on line 2:He completes row 1 of line 7 by entering an X in Private for 7A, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code 7 in 7D, the name of the payer in 7E, and $25,000 in 7F. ........................................ ................................Line 7F, Row 1. .......................$25,000Step 3:Henry refers to the questionnaire on page 16 to decide which Section of Form 4884 is to be completed. Henry answers yes to question 1 as he was born prior to January 1, 1953. He answers no to question 2 because he was not born during the period January 1, 1946 through January 1, 1949. He answers no to question 3 because he was not born prior to January 1, 1946. He answers no to question 4 because he is not receiving benefits from a deceased spouse. Based on his answers he completes Section C of Form 4:Since he is single and his total pension benefits are over the maximum allowed, Henry enters the maximum of $20,000 on line 27 and on the Schedule 1, line 25. ........................................ ........................................ .Line 27. .....................................Sch edule 1, Line 25. ..................$20,000$20,00018Scenar io 3: Married filing separately with filer born after January 1, 1949 through December 31, 1952 (Tier 2) and separated spouse born prior to January 1, 1946 (Tier 1).James and Phyllis are married filing separately. James was born in 1951 and is receiving a public pension of $50,000. Phyllis was born in 1941 and is receiving a public pension of $45, 1: As James is married filing separately, he completes lines 1 and 2, leaves the spouse s name line blank, and includes the spouse s Social Security number on line 2:James enters 1951 on line 4 and skips line 3:He completes row 1 of line 7 by entering an X in Public for 7A, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code in 7D, the name of the payer in 7E, and $50,000 in 7F. .............................Line 7F, Row 1 .........................$50,000Step 4:James refers to the questionnaire on page 16 to decide which Section of Form 4884 is to be completed. He answers yes to question 1, no to question 2, no to question 3 because the separated spouse s year of birth is not relevant, no to question 4 and completes Section C of Form 5:Since he is married filing separately and his total pension benefits are over the maximum allowed, James enters the maximum of $20,000 on line 27 and on the Schedule 1, line 25. ........................................ ........................................ ........Line 27. ..................................Schedu le 1, Line 25. ..................$20,000$20,000Scenario 2: Joint filer with the older spouse born prior to January 1, 1946 (Tier 1) with private and public retirement/pension and Beverly are filing a joint return. Jerry was born in 1943 and is receiving a public pension of $40,000 with a distribution code of 7. Beverly was born in 1946 and is receiving a private pension of $60,000 with a distribution code of 1:After completing lines 1 through 3, Jerry and Beverly enter 1943 on line 4 and 1946 on line 2:They complete row 1 of line 7 by entering an X in Public for 7A, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code 7 in 7D, the name of the payer in 7E and $40,000 in 7F. ........................................ ............ Line 7F, Row 1. .......................$40,000They complete row 2 of line 7 by entering an X in Private for 7A, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code 7 in 7D, the name of the payer in 7E and $60,000 in 7F ........................................ .............Line 7F, Row 2 .........................$60,000Step 3:Jerry and Beverly refer to the questionnaire on page 16 to decide which Section of Form 4884 is to be completed. They answer yes to question 1, no to question 2, yes to question 3 and complete Section A of Form 4:They enter $99,623 on line 8 as they are married filing jointly. .......Line 8. ......................................$9 9,623Step 5:They enter $40,000 on line 9, the total of their public pension benefits. ........................................ ........................................ ..............Line 9. ......................................$4 0,000Step 6:They subtract line 9 from line 8 and enter $59,623 on line 10. .........Line 10. ...................................$59,6 23Step 7:They enter $60,000 on line 11, the total of their private pension benefits. ........................................ ........................................ ..............Line 11 .....................................$60 ,000Step 8:They leave line 12 blank as it does not apply to them .......................Line 12 .....................................Lea ve blankStep 9:They enter $60,000 on line 13, the total of lines 11 and 12. .............Line 13. ....................................$60, 000Step 10:They enter $59,623, the smaller of lines 10 or 13. ...........................Line 14. ....................................$59, 623Step 11:They add lines 9 and 14, enter $99,623 on line 15 and carry this amount to Schedule 1, line 25. Line 15. .....................................Sch edule 1, Line 25. ..................$99,623$99,62319Scenar io 4: Single filer born after January 1, 1949 through December 31, 1952 (Tier 2) with SSA exempt is filing as single. She was born in 1950 and is receiving a pension of $25,000 as a retired 1:After completing lines 1 and 2, Monique enters 1950 on line 2:She completes row 1 of line 7 by entering an X in Public for 7A, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code in 7D, the name of the payer in 7E, and the $25,000 in 7F, Row 1. ...........................$25,000Step 3:She refers to the questionnaire on page 16 to decide which Section of Form 4884 is to be completed. She answers yes to question 1, no to question 2, no to question 3, no to question 4 and completes Section C of Form 4:Since she is single and receiving benefits from employment that was SSA exempt her maximum allowable pension deduction is increased from $20,000 to $35,000. She would enter $25,000, the lesser of her total retirement and pension benefits or the maximum allowable pension deduction, on line 27 and on the Schedule 1, line : It is important for taxpayers with benefits that were SSA exempt to check the box(es) on line 23 of the Schedule 27. .......................................S chedule 1, Line 2323A. ........................................ ....23B. ........................................ ....23C. ........................................ ....Schedule 1, Line 25 ....................$25,000195065X$25,00 0Scenario 6: Filer and spouse both born after December 31, 1952 (Tier 3).Scott and Lisa are filing a joint return. Scott, born in 1954, is receiving private pension benefits of $30,000. Lisa, born in 1957, is receiving an IRA distribution (private pension) of $20, 1:As both Scott and Lisa were born after December 31, 1952, they are not entitled to a pension subtraction. Do not complete Form 4884. ........................................ ........................Do not file Form 5: Single filer born on or after January 1, 1953 but before January 2, 1954 (Tier 3) with SSA exempt is filing as single, was born in 1953, and is receiving SSA exempt pension of $8,000 and a private pension of $10,000. Step 1:After completing lines 1 and 2, Leigh enters 1953 on line 2:Leigh completes row 1 of line 7 by entering an X in Public for 7A, t he payer FEI N i n 7C, t he d ist r ibut ion code i n 7D, t he name of the payer in 7E and $8,000 in 7F. Leigh completes row 2 of line 7 by entering an X in Private for 7A, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code in 7D, the name of the payer in 7E and $10,000 in 7F. Line 7F, Row 1. ...........................$8,000Line 7F, Row 2. ...........................$10,000Step 3:Leigh refers to the questionnaire on page 16 to decide which section of Form 4884 is to be completed. She answers no to question 1, but because she has reached age 62 and receives SSA exempt retirement benefits, she completes Form 4884, Section 4:Since Leigh is single, she enters $15,000, which is the lesser of her total retirement and pension benefits ($18,000) or the maximum allowable pension deduction ($15,000) on line 28 and on the Schedule 1, line : It is important for taxpayers with benefits that were SSA exempt to check the box(es) on line 23 of the Schedule 28. .......................................S chedule 1, Line 2323A. ........................................ ....23B. ........................................ ....23C. ........................................ ....Schedule 1, Line 25 ....................$15,000195362X$15,00 020Scenario 7: Joint filers, with the older spouse born prior to January 1, 1946 (Tier 1) who died during the tax year with private pension and Mary are filing a joint return. Bob, born in 1944, has a private pension of $30,000. Bob died on October 15, 2015. Bob received a 1099-R for $25,000 with a distribution code of 7 and Mary received a 1099-R for $5,000 with a distribution code of 4 for the remainder of Bob s pension. Mary, born in 1952, is receiving a public pension of $70,000 with a distribution code of 7. Step 1:After completing lines 1 through 3, Mary enters 1944 on line 4 and 1952 on line 5. Mary does not complete line 6 or check 7B because Bob died during the current tax 2:Mary completes row 1 of line 7 by entering an X in Private for 7A, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code 7 in 7D, the name of payer in 7E, and $25,000 in 7F. ........................................ Line 7F, Row 1. ........................$25,000She completes row 2 of line 7 by entering an X in Private for 7A, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code 4 in 7D, the name of payer in 7E, and $5,000 in 7F ........................................ .................Line 7F, Row 2. ........................$5,000She completes row 3 of line 7 by entering an X in Public for 7A, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code 7 in 7D, the name of payer in 7E, and $70,000 in 7F ........................................ ...............Line 7F, Row 3. ........................$70,000Step 3:Mary refers to the questionnaire on page 16 to decide which Section of Form 4884 is to be completed. She answers yes to question 1, no to question 2, yes to question 3 and completes Section A of Form 4:She enters $99,623 on line 8 as she is filing jointly .......................Line 8. .......................................$ 99,623Step 5:She enters $70,000, her public pension, on line 9. .........................Line 9. .......................................$ 70,000Step 6:She subtracts line 9 from line 8 and enters $29,623 on line 10. ....Line 10. .....................................$29 ,623Step 7:She enters $30,000, the total private pension benefits, on line 11. Line 11. .....................................$30 ,000Step 8:Mary leaves line 12 blank as Bob is not considered a deceased spouse for purposes of this return; they are filing jointly. ............Line 12. .....................................lea ve blankStep 9:Mary enters $30,000 on line 13, the total of lines 11 and 12. ........Line 13. .....................................$30 ,000Step 10:She enters $29,623, the smaller of lines 10 or 13. ..........................Line 14. .....................................$29 ,623St e p 11:She adds lines 9 and 14, enters $99,623 on line 15 and carries this amount to Schedule 1, line 25. ........................................ ........Line 15. .....................................Sch edule 1, Line 25. .................$99,623$99,623Scenario 8: Joint filers born after 1952 (Tier 3) with retirement/pension benefits and receiving surviving benefits from a deceased spouse born in 1949 (Tier 2).Mark and Nancy are filing a joint return. Mark, born in 1953, is receiving a private pension of $25,000. Nancy was born in 1953. Nancy s deceased spouse, Eduardo, was born in 1949 and died in 2008. Nancy is receiving $35,000 in surviving spouse pension benefits from Eduardo s private 1:After completing lines 1 through 3, Mark and Nancy enter 1953 on line 4 and 1953 on line 5. Nancy is receiving pension benefits from a deceased spouse so she then completes line 6. She enters Eduardo s full name on line 6a, his Social Security number on line 6b, and 1949 on line 2:As Mark and Nancy were both born in Tier 3 Mark s pension is not deductible and should not be listed on line 7 of Form complete row 1 of line 7 by entering an X in Private for 7A, an X in 7B, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code in 7D, the name of payer in 7E, and $35,000 in 7F, Row 1. ..........................$35,000Step 3:They refer to the questionnaire on page 16 to decide which Section of Form 4884 is to be completed. They answer yes to question 1, no to question 2, no to question 3, no to question 4 and complete Section C of Form 4:They are married filing jointly and enter the total of their benefits from line 7 of $35,000, since it is less than the maximum of $40,000, on line 27 and on the Michigan Schedule 1, line 25. ........................................ ............................Line 27. .......................................S chedule 1, Line 25 ...................$35,000$35,00021Scena rio 9: Joint filers born after 1952 (Tier 3) with retirement/pension benefits and receiving surviving benefits from a deceased spouse born in 1944 (Tier 1).Howard and Georgia are filing a joint return. Howard, born in 1953, is receiving a private pension of $40,000. Georgia was born in 1955. Howard s deceased spouse, Edith, was born in 1944 and died in 2006. Howard is receiving $30,000 in surviving spouse pension benefits from Edith s private 1:After completing lines 1 through 3, Howard and Georgia enter 1953 on line 4 and 1955 on line 5. Howard is receiving pension benefits from a deceased spouse so he then completes line 6. He enters Edith s full name on line 6a, her Social Security number on line 6b, and 1944 on line 2:As Howard and Georgia were both born in Tier 3 their pension benefits are not deductible and should not be listed on line 7 of Form complete row 1 of line 7 by entering an X in Private for 7A, an X in 7B, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code in 7D, the name of payer in 7E, and $30,000 in 7F. ........Line 7F, Row 1. .....................$30,000Step 3:They refer to the questionnaire on page 16 to decide which Section of Form 4884 is to be completed. They answer yes to question 1, no to question 2, no to question 3, yes to question 4 and complete Section B of Form 4:They enter $99,623 on line 16 as they are filing jointly. .........Line 16. ..................................$99,62 3Step 5:They leave line 17 blank because they are not receiving public benefits from Edith. ........................................ ..............Li ne 17. ...................................leave blankStep 6:They subtract line 17 from line 16 and enter $99,623 online 18. ........................................ ........................................ ....Line 18. ...................................$99,6 23Step 7:They enter $30,000, private benefits received from Howard s deceased spouse, Edith, on line 19. ........................................ ..Line 19. ...................................$30,0 00Step 8:They enter the smaller of lines 18 or 19, $30,000, on line 20. ...................................$30,0 00Step 9:Howard and Georgia add lines 17 and 20 and enter $30,000 on line 21. ........................................ ........................................ .Line 21. ...................................$30,0 00Step 10:Since Howard and Georgia are born in Tier 3 and do not have deductible benefits they would leave line 22 blank. .......Line 22. ...................................leave blankStep 11: They enter $40,000 on line 23 as they are filing jointly. .........Line 23 ....................................$40, 000Step 12:Since line 21 is less than line 23 they enter $10,000 on line 24. ........................................ ........................................ .....Line 24. ...................................$10,0 00Step 13:They enter the smaller of lines 22 or 24, zero, on line 25. .....Line 25. ...................................$0St e p 14:They add lines 21 and 25 and enter $30,000 on line 26 and Schedule 1, line 25. ........................................ ..........................Line 26. ...................................Sched ule 1, Line 25 ................$30,000$30,00022Scenario 10: Single filer born after January 1, 1949 through December 31, 1952 (Tier 2) receiving surviving benefits from a deceased spouse born in 1939 (Tier 1).Alice, born in 1952, is a surviving spouse filing a single return. Her deceased husband Miguel was born in 1939 and died in 2010. Alice has public pension benefits of $37,500 and is also receiving surviving spouse benefits from Miguel s public pension of $69, 1:After completing lines 1 and 2, Alice enters 1947 on line 4. Alice is receiving pension benefits from a deceased spouse so she then completes line 6. She enters Miguel s full name on line 6a, his Social Security number on line 6b, and 1939 on line 2:She completes row 1 of line 7 by entering an X in Public for 7A, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code in 7D, the name of payer in 7E, and $37,500 in completes row 2 of line 7 by entering an X in Public for 7A, entering an X in 7B, the payer FEIN in 7C, the distribution code of 4 in 7D, the name of payer in 7E, and $69,000 in 7F. ..................Line 7F, Row 1. ......................Line 7F, Row 2 .......................$37,50 0$69,000Step 3:Alice refers to the questionnaire on page 16 to decide which Section of Form 4884 is to be completed. She answers yes to question 1, no to question 2, no to question 3, yes to question 4 and completes Section B of Form 4:She enters $49,811 on line 16 because she is filing single. ...............Line 16. ...................................$ 49, 811Step 5:She enters $69,000, public benefits received from her deceased spouse, Miguel, on line 17. ........................................ ........................Li ne 17. ...................................$69,0 00Step 6:Since line 17 is more than line 16, she enters zero on line 18 ..........Line 18. ...................................$0Ste p 7:She leaves line 19 blank because she is not receiving private benefits from her deceased spouse. ........................................ ..........Line 19. ...................................leave blankStep 8:She enters the smaller of lines 18 or 19, she enters zero on line 20 .Line 20. ....................................$0St ep 9:Alice adds lines 17 and 20 and enters $69,000 on line 21. ...............Line 21. ...................................$69,0 00Step 10:She enters $37,500 on line 22, the total of her benefits ....................Line 22. ...................................$37,5 0 0St e p 11:Alice enters $20,000 on line 23 as she is filing single .....................Line 23. ...................................$20,0 00Step 12:Since line 21 is more than line 23 she enters zero on line 24 ...........Line 24. ...................................$0Ste p 13:She enters the smaller of lines 22 or 24, zero, on line 25. ................Line 25. ...................................$0St e p 14:Alice adds lines 21 and 25 and enters $69,000 on line 26 and Schedule 1, line 25 ........................................ ....................................Line 26. ...................................Sched ule 1, Line 25 ................$69,000$69,000Scenario 11: Filer and spouse both born in Tier 2 with the older spouse born in and Betty are Michigan residents and are filing a joint return. William, born in 1951, is receiving public pension benefits of $10,000 and wages from a part-time job. Betty, born in 1948, is receiving private pension benefits of $20, 1:As the older of William and Betty was born in 1948 (age 67 in 2015), they do not complete Form 4884 and instead complete Schedule 1, lines 23 and 24 for the Michigan Standard Deduction. This standard deduction applies against all income (pension, wages, interest, etc.). ........................................ ............Do not file Form 4884.

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